Artwork by Nicole Jones.
Artwork by Nicole Jones.
Artwork by Nicole Jones.

The pairing of these two words, “gender” and “dysphoria”, is an insidious and anti-feminist one. Gender, a hierarchical construct understood by feminists as oppressive, is inherently distressing. Women and girls, especially, are absolutely right to feel uncomfortable with gender. It has never been something that women should strive to feel at ease within. Perhaps this is why referrals for girls to the Tavistock’s Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) have increased by 5,337% in under a decade.

Originating in the DSM-5 in 2013, the term “gender dysphoria” has quickly entered the mainstream, replacing “gender identity disorder” in the editions before. In…


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“Render me more equal” says Milton’s Eve, before coming out as non-binary.

Years ago, feminists would argue that women were multifaceted, complex and capable. Qualities previously reserved for men, it was crucial to women’s liberation from the stifling gender role in which they were thought to be so intrinsically bound that the emphasis was placed on their ability, as women, to be able to openly exist as such. It is something most of us would take for granted now — after all, we can be journalists, CEOs or even presidential candidates. Society, we are told, has rid itself of sex-based limitations; instead, oppression manifests in our denial of gender plurality and an…


The woman who lived.

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“But I’m not guilty,” said K. “there’s been a mistake. How is it even possible for someone to be guilty? We’re all human beings here, one like the other.” “That is true” said the priest “but that is how the guilty speak”

Franz Kafka, The Trial

This week, J.K. Rowling has been subjected to public trial over a series of tweets made on the topic of biological sex and what we ought to call the class of people who menstruate. Readers may recall the word “women” — a relic of a bygone era — formerly used to refer to this…


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Still from the livestream.

YouTuber ‘ Smooth Sanchez’ went viral on Monday with a controversial video streamed live from the New York City #BlackLivesMatter (BLM) protests, in which he pretends to work for BLM, and asks white people to kneel in solidarity. Despite the cheers of encouragement in the live chat replay, it’s clear Sanchez has failed to read the room, given the disparity of 2.1k dislikes (about as many as he has subscribers for the channel) compared to just 377 likes. During times of great civil disturbance, we can rest assured that it’s business as usual for edgelord trolls. The following Friday, #GoBaldForBLM…


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For the sake of balance, The Guardian have published an open letter and reader’s responses to Suzanne Moore’s column ‘Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced’. Here, Moore contrasts the no-platforming of Selina Todd, a professor of modern history at the University of Oxford, from a women’s liberation event, with the celebration of child rapist Roman Polanski at the César Awards that same weekend. Neither instances are isolated incidents, as women who acknowledge sex as a material reality are frequently silenced and harassed, while predatory men continue to exercise power. In short: women’s words are…


This is the full transcript of the speech given at Òran Mór for the LGB Alliance launch event.

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I’m going to be talking a bit today about my experience as a young person in navigating this topic. I’m a co-founder of forwomen, along with Trina Budge, Marion Calder (who you’ll hear from later) and the late Magdalen Berns. We are campaign group that aims to combat the proposed changes to the gender recognition act. I’m also a student at Edinburgh University, at the art school, so as you can imagine I’m surrounded by…likeminded activists.

I have been engaged with this…


This is the full transcript of a speech given at Camden Town Hall for the We Need to Talk event.

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In 1697, 20 year old Edinburgh student Thomas Aikenhead was the last person to be executed for blasphemy in the U.K. Now, “blasphemy” is so passé. Institutions have adopted the handy euphemism “violent and disorderly conduct” or “hate speech” to cover their tracks when persecuting and reprimanding speech they believe to be unholy. …

Nicole Jones

Artist and writer based in Edinburgh. To support my writing: paypal.me/satiricole

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